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Kentucky Project Archaeology

KAS is the major sponsor for Project Archaeology in Kentucky. 

Project Archaeology is a national heritage education program designed to provide teachers with the tools they need to educate young Americans about our nation's cultural heritage. It uses archaeological inquiry to foster understanding of past and present cultures; improve social studies and science education; and enhance citizenship education to help preserve our archaeological legacy.

KAS participates in this national program by supporting a group of trained facilitators who conduct teacher workshops, attend state and national teachers’ conferences, and develop Kentucky project archaeology materials.

Teachers participating in a Project Archaeology workshop collaborate on a project.

Folks participating at our first workshop, Wickliffe Mounds in 2000. Photo Credit: Carla Hildebrand

Never heard of Project Archaeology?!!  READ ON!

Project Archaeology is a comprehensive archaeology and heritage education program for everyone interested in learning or teaching about our nation’s rich cultural legacy and protecting it for future generations to learn from and enjoy.  Project Archaeology includes publications, professional development for educators, networking opportunities, and continuing support for participants.  Using an innovative hands-on approach to history, the program teaches scientific inquiry, citizenship, personal ethics and character, and cultural understanding. It uses archaeological inquiry to foster understanding of past and present cultures; improve social studies and science education; and enhance citizenship education to help preserve our archaeological legacy.


Project Archaeology teaches four enduring understandings:


• Understanding the human past is essential for understanding the present and shaping the future.


• Learning about cultures past and present is essential for living in a pluralistic society and world.


• Archaeology is a way to learn about past cultures.


• Stewardship of archaeological resources is everyone’s responsibility.


Its target audience is upper elementary through secondary teachers and their students; museum docents, youth group leaders, and heritage site interpreters; and parents and citizens.

Continuing Professional Development

Graduates of Project Archaeology workshops and on-line courses continue their professional development through printed updates, networking opportunities, and additional learning and teaching opportunities.

Kentucky Project Archaeology Intrigue of the Past Workshops


Educators of all kinds may attend our workshops, but workshop size is limited to 20 participants.  Attendees are responsible for their own lodging.  To reserve a spot for yourself at an upcoming Kentucky Project Archaeology Intrigue of the Past workshop or for more information about Project Archaeology in Kentucky, contact Gwynn Henderson, State Coordinator, at 859-257-1919.

 

Investigating Shelter
Investigating Shelter consists of nine comprehensive lessons guiding students through the archaeological study of shelter, including a toolkit of archaeological and scientific concepts, and a final performance of understanding. Investigating Shelter teaches six enduring understandings, and all learning is guided by essential questions. The curriculum fulfills three interconnected objectives: increase cultural understanding, help students make a personal connection to history, and instill strong historic preservation ethics.

The national office offers on-line courses for Project Archaeology

Curriculum Materials
Project Archaeology’s basic activity guide, Intrigue of the Past: A Teacher’s Activity Guide for Fourth through Seventh Grades was published in 1993. Intrigue is widely recognized as an excellent resource for teachers, archaeologists, and other educators.

Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter is a supplementary science and social studies curriculum unit for grades 3 through 5.  Investigating Shelter was launched in 2009.  It is endorsed by the National Council for the Social Studies.

 


Last Updated 9/3/2015